Liquid Metal Alloys in Electronics

$125.00

Liquid metal alloys are of rapidly increasing interest in electronics because they combine the high electrical conductivity of metals with the ease of manipulation and reconfiguration of liquids.

$125.00
$125.00

Liquid Metal Alloys in Electronics
David J. Fisher
Materials Research Foundations Vol. 70
Publication Date 2020, 136 Pages
Print ISBN 978-1-64490-068-0 (release date March, 2020)
ePDF ISBN 978-1-64490-069-7
DOI: 10.21741/9781644900697

Liquid metal alloys are of rapidly increasing interest in electronics because they combine the high electrical conductivity of metals with the ease of manipulation and reconfiguration of liquids. The book focuses on such issues as self-assembled monolayers, energy-harvesting, reconfigurable and flexible antennae, sensors, conformable electronics, the creation of non-wetting super-hydrophobic or super-lyophobic surfaces, vacuum-assisted infiltration techniques, development of microfluidics, deformable electrodes and wearable electronics. The book references 270 original resources and includes their direct web link for in-depth reading.

Keywords
Liquid Metals, Gallium-Indium Alloys, Galinstan, EGaIn, Self-Assembled Monolayers, Energy-Harvesting, Reconfigurable Antennae, Sensors, Conformable Electrodes, Stretchable Wires and Interconnects, Self-Healing Circuits, Gallium-Lyophilic Surfaces, Wettability of Liquid Metal, Substrate Topology, Selective Wetting Deposition Technique, Gallium-Indium Droplets on Thin Metal Films, Substrate Texture upon Wetting, Dielectrophoresis, Microfluidics, Deformable Electrodes, Wearable Electronics, Flexible Antennae, Surface Oxidation of Alloys

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About the Author

Dr Fisher has wide knowledge and experience of the fields of engineering, metallurgy and solid-state physics, beginning with work at Rolls-Royce Aero Engines on turbine-blade research, related to the Concord supersonic passenger-aircraft project, which led to a BSc degree (1971) from the University of Wales. This was followed by theoretical and experimental work on the directional solidification of eutectic alloys having the ultimate aim of developing composite turbine blades. This work led to a doctoral degree (1978) from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (Lausanne). He then acted for many years as an editor of various academic journals, in particular Defect and Diffusion Forum. In recent years he has specialised in writing monographs which introduce readers to the most rapidly developing ideas in the fields of engineering, metallurgy and solid-state physics. His latest paper will appear shortly in International Materials Reviews, and he is co-author of the widely-cited student textbook, Fundamentals of Solidification.