Residual Stresses in Selective Laser Melted Components of Different Geometries

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Residual Stresses in Selective Laser Melted Components of Different Geometries

M. Reid, T. Sercombe, A. Paradowska, X. Li

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Abstract. As an emerging Additive Manufacturing (AM) technique, Selective Laser Melting (SLM) has found a promising application in biomedical field due to its advantages in fabricating Ti-6Al-4V components with specific and customised geometries. It has been reported that accumulated residual stress as a result of the high heating and cooling rates during SLM and the topological design of the components can largely influence the mechanical and functional properties of the fabricated components. In this study three notched samples were produced by SLM manufacturing. The samples were built using the same laser melting conditions on the same base size. The notches ranged in angle from 60° to 120°. Residual stresses in the three notched samples were analysed using the state-of-the-art neutron residual strain measurement instrument, Kowari, at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation. A combination of gauge volumes were utilised to obtain high precision measurements at the notch tips and general measurements around the tips. This paper reports on the manufacture and measurement of differing residual stresses in the three SLM fabricated notches.

Keywords
Residual Stress, Neutron Scattering, Selective Laser Melting, Titanium

Published online 12/22/2016, 6 pages
Copyright © 2016 by the author(s)
Published under license by Materials Research Forum LLC., Millersville PA, USA

Citation: M. Reid, T. Sercombe, A. Paradowska, X. Li, ‘Residual Stresses in Selective Laser Melted Components of Different Geometries’, Materials Research Proceedings, Vol. 2, pp 383-388, 2017

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21741/9781945291173-65

The article was published as article 65 of the book Residual Stresses 2016

Content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence. Any further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the title of the work, journal citation and DOI.

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