Rhenium Disulfide

$125.00

All you want to know about Rhenium disulfide in an easy to read condensed format. Rhenium disulfide especially in low-dimensional form, is a subject of lively research into its electronic and optical properties. The field of 2D materials such as graphene and its analogues has been growing very rapidly.

$125.00
$125.00

Rhenium Disulfide
D.J. Fisher
Materials Research Foundations Vol. 40
Publication Date 2018, 160 Pages
Print ISBN 978-1-945291-92-0 (release date November 15th, 2018)
ePDF ISBN 978-1-945291-93-7
DOI: 10.21741/9781945291937

All you want to know about Rhenium disulfide in an easy to read condensed format. Rhenium disulfide especially in low-dimensional form, is a subject of lively research into its electronic and optical properties. The field of 2D materials such as graphene and its analogues has been growing very rapidly. This class of materials also includes rhenium disulfide and rhenium diselenide, which belong to the transition-metal dichalcogenide family. Due to their reduced crystal symmetry, they exhibit distinct electrical and optical characteristics along certain in-plane crystal directions.
The group-VI members such as molybdenum and tungsten are the most typical ones, but group-VII rhenium disulfide has been attracting most attention of late because of its unusual structural, electro-optical and chemical properties; especially an indirect-to-direct band-gap transition which occurs when thinned down from bulk to monolayer. The group-VI transition-metal dichalcogenides have a 1H, 2H, 3R or 1T structure, whereas ReS2 has a distorted 1T structure which imparts an in-plane anisotropy to its physical properties. Few other materials (black phosphorus, ReSe2, TiS3, ZrS3) exhibit such an in-plane structural anisotropy. This makes ReS2 unique among the transition-metal chalcogenides. Atomically thin rhenium disulphide is characterized by weak interlayer coupling and a distorted 1T structure, which leads to the anisotropy in optical and electrical properties. It also possesses structural and vibrational anisotropy, layer-independent electrical and optical properties and metal-free magnetism. In these respects, it differs from group-VI transition-metal dichalcogenides such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2 and WSe2. It is already being used in solid-state electronics, catalysis, energy storage and energy-harvesting applications.

Keywords
Electronic Devices, Energy Storage, Energy Harvesting, Catalysis, Transistors, Resistors, Lasers, Rhenium Disulfide, Rhenium Diselenide, Two-dimensional Materials, Layered Materials, Black Phosphorus, Transition-metal Dichalcogenides, Metal-free Magnetism, ReS2, ReSe2, TiS3, ZrS3, MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, WSe2

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About the Author

Dr Fisher has wide knowledge and experience of the fields of engineering, metallurgy and solid-state physics, beginning with work at Rolls-Royce Aero Engines on turbine-blade research, related to the Concord supersonic passenger-aircraft project, which led to a BSc degree (1971) from the University of Wales. This was followed by theoretical and experimental work on the directional solidification of eutectic alloys having the ultimate aim of developing composite turbine blades. This work led to a doctoral degree (1978) from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (Lausanne). He then acted for many years as an editor of various academic journals, in particular Defect and Diffusion Forum. In recent years he has specialised in writing monographs which introduce readers to the most rapidly developing ideas in the fields of engineering, metallurgy and solid-state physics. His latest paper will appear shortly in International Materials Reviews, and he is co-author of the widely-cited student textbook, Fundamentals of Solidification.